revisiting Cartographies of the Absolute: a lecture by Alberto Toscano and Jeff Kinkle

What must a map of the world depict?  What aesthetic forms can “map” late capitalism, critically disclosing its dynamics and its totalizations?  What is the difference, aesthetically and politically, between a representation of capital and a representation of class antagonism?

world-map-abstract-painting-2-stefan-kuhnInterCcECT is delighted to partner with Gallery 400 for a special lecture by visiting scholars Alberto Toscano and Jeff Kinkle, authors of Cartographies of the Absolute.  Revisiting and revising the themes in their book, Toscano & Kinkle will discuss arts of capitalism and arts of the state.

May we suggest Cartographies in the Los Angeles Review of Books?

Wednesday 2 September, 6:00pm
Gallery 400 Lecture Room
400 S Peoria St
Blue Line: UIC Halsted

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Form & Formalism, then and now

InterCcECT highlights the V21 Collective‘s pre- symposium reading group on Form & Formalism. purpleround Selections from George Eliot, Cleanth Brooks, and Caroline Levine are on the table; session is Friday 21 August, 3-5pm, DePaul Library Rosati Room (Room 300, 2350 N Kenmore, Redline: Fullerton).  Contact v21collective at gmail for the readings.

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livable communes

barricade-paris-1871“There are moments when a articular event or struggle enters vividly into the figurability of the present, and this seems to me to be the case with the Paris Commune today.”  Thus opens Communal Luxury: The Political Imaginary of the Paris Commune, Kristin Ross’s manifesto for new futures of the past.  What does the 19th century hold for us today?  What do the practices of livability in the commune commend to our unlivable world?

Join InterCcECT for a reading group session Tuesday 11 August, 3-5pm, at, fittingly The Bourgeois Pig (Red line: Fullerton).    We’ll plan to read the entire (shortish) book.

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Presentism, Form, and the Future of History

The V21 Collective announces its inaugural symposium, “Presentism, Form, and the Future of History,” October 9-10 at the University of Chicago.  6a00d8341c562c53ef01bb07d43410970d Designed as a series of roundtables on contemporary literary study, the symposium is free and welcomes public participation.

InterCcECT particularly highlights the pre-symposium reading group this summer and fall, with sessions on queer temporality and queering historicism; form and formalism; and description and post-critique.

Join us for the first reading group session, 21 July, 3-5pm, at the DePaul University Library, room 300.  Readings include a GLQ roundtable on queer time, excerpts from Elizabeth Freeman’s Time Binds, and from Walter Pater’s The Renaissance.  Contact interccect at gmail.com or v21collective at gmail.com to receive PDFs.

And mark your calendars for the symposium:

PRESENTISM, FORM, AND THE FUTURE OF HISTORY
a series of collaborative, experimental roundtables featuring affiliates of the V21 collective
October 9th and 10th, 2015
University of Chicago

Friday, October 9
9:00am: Opening Remarks: Benjamin Morgan

9:15-11am: Bleak House Today
On how the form of Dickens’s novel resonates through time
Alex Woloch (roundtable anchor)
Elaine Auyoung
Elisha Cohn
David Coombs
Jonathan Farina
Emily Steinlight
Megan Ward

11:15-12:45: Theorizing the Present
On the continuing significance of Nietzsche’s critique of nineteenth-century historicisms, “On the Use and Abuse of History for Life”
Pearl Brilmyer (discussion facilitator)
Danielle Coriale
Eleanor Courtemanche
Devin Griffiths
Matthew Sussmann
Danny Wright

2pm-4pm: The Way We Write Now
On questions of method and interpretation in the current work of V21 affiliates
Caroline Levine (roundtable anchor)
Carolyn Betensky
Ellis Hanson
Anna Kornbluh
David Kurnick
Jesse Rosenthal
Jesse Oak Taylor

4:30-6:30 Empire and Unfielding
On the disciplinary relationship between Victorian Studies and studies of empire, grounded in Antoinette Burton and Isabel Hofmeyr’s Ten Books That Shaped the British Empire: Creating an Imperial Common
Antoinette Burton and Isabel Hofmeyr (roundtable anchors)
Tanya Agathocleous
Nathan Hensley
Jos Lavery
Sebastian Lecourt
Nasser Mufti
Mary Mullen

7:00-10:00
Affiliates Dinner
Evening Salon, Maeve Adams, facilitator

Saturday, October 10
9:30-11: Plenary, Bruce Robbins
Introduction, Molly Clark Hillard
Response, Zach Samalin

11:30-12:30: Symposium wrap-up, moderated by Elaine Hadley

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This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. To register, email V21collective at gmail dot com.

Made possible by the generous support of the Franke Institute for the Humanities, the Department of English Language and Literature, the Nicholson Center for British Studies, and the Center for International Studies.

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tear it down: The Undercommons

Amidst growing protests against systemic and state-administered premature death, and beyond #hashtagactivism, calls for a new black radicalism are resounding.  In The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study, Stefano Harney and Fred Moten advocate for “the undercommons” as a subject of such radicalism, “the prophetic organization that works for the red and black abolition…not so much the abolition of prisons but the abolition of a society that could have prisons, that could have slavery, that couple have the wage, and therefore not abolition as the elimination of anything but abolition as the founding of a new society.”      underpass-ea2-800

Join InterCcECT for a reading group on The UnderCommons, chapters 0-6, on Thursday 9 July, 4pm (purchase the text or follow the link to a free version made available by the publisher).

VENUE CHANGE: La Haven Coffee, 1241 S Michigan.  (Roosevelt station)

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after the modern

In The Order of Things, Foucault meticulously, if idiosyncratically, catalogues epistemic shifts from resemblance to representation to History, regimes of knowledge corresponding to ages of the world.  At the time of writing, nearly 50 years ago, he located his work in the still-unfolding modern episteme.  Are we now modern?shutterstock_99108530 Join us for the conclusion of our reading sessions, Monday 22 June, 3pm (note earlier time), at The Bourgeois Pig.

What are your summer theory projects?  Contact us to propose events!

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the limits of representation

Our archaeological dig into the human sciences continues; join us next Monday, 15 June, 4pm, at The Bourgeois Pig (red line: Fullerton), for Foucault’s The Order of Things (chapter 6, Exchanging, and chapter 7, The Limits of Representation).  We’ll plan to finish the book for the week after.

resolver

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