Where does a literary work come from?

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InterCcECT rejoices to return from winter break to a new year of inquiry.  We get started this week rather quickly, with a newly scheduled practice job talk :

InterCcECTer Audrey Wasser presents”Problem and Genesis: On Beckett’s Proust,” in which she reads Samuel Beckett’s Molloy and his writings on Proust to pursue a series of interlocking questions: What is the genesis of a literary work? How do we understand the autonomy and integrity of a literary work with respect to its influences and causes? Is a notion of causation, in fact, completely inappropriate to literature?  Must a work’s autonomy be conceived by means of a negation of all of the conditions that gave rise to it? 

Join us at 4:00pm Friday 24 January, U of Chicago campus, Classics, Room 110 (1010 E 59th St).  

Fulfill your new year’s theory resolutions!  Write interccect at gmail dot com to propose collaborations, and check out our calendar for recommendations like:

Kant’s Conception of Number: A Summing Up

In Conversation with Great Minds: Photographer Sally Mann

Worlding Realisms

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radical alternatives to radical empiricism: an InterCcECT mini seminar with Joshua Kates

imagesFrom systems theory to object oriented ontology, the post-human to the multitude, empiricism and its latent historicism underlie the most orthodox (and most contentious) questions and methods in the humanities today. In Historicity and Holism, Joshua Kates plumbs the depths of this radical empiricism, proffering an experimental absolutism as its most resourceful alternative. InterCcECT is delighted to host a mini-seminar with Professor Kates, focusing on “Radical Empiricism Revisited,” an excerpt from that project.

Join us Friday 22 November, 3pm, at our frequent host The Newberry Library, room B-91.

Contact us to request the reading.
Abstract:
“Radical Empiricism Revisited” stages a major invention in contemporary theory, by grouping together work around Deleuze, Latour, Luhmann and others as a form of empiricism inflected by Kant, and contrasting this to a more innovative and experimental relation to the absolute found in Derrida and the early Foucault. My treatment is an outgrowth of possibilities opened up by my current project, Historicity and Holism (parts of which have appeared or about to appear in differences and diacritics), as well as those I explored in my previous two books on Derrida and phenomenology, history of science, and philosophy of language.

As always, write us to propose or announce events, check out our calendar for recommendations like Hegel’s Critique of Kant
and Forms of Fiction: The Novel in English, and connect with us on Facebook for frequent links and commentary.

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past dialectics and future destructions: Malabou’s plasticity

Catherine Malabou has rapidly elasticized possible futures for Continental Philosophy by reorienting our understanding of Hegelian thought around the notion of plasticity, “a capacity to receive form and a capacity to produce form.”
plasticity
In her recent short work Plasticity at the Dusk of Writing: Dialectic, Destruction, Deconstruction, Malabou considers writing as a scene of plasticity and model of political and ethical action. Join InterCcECT for a reading group on these crepuscular illuminations of Derrida, Hegel, Heidegger, Freud, Levi-Strauss, and Levinas.

Thursday 17 October
3-5pm
Department of English conference room
UIC, 2028 University Hall
601 S Morgan St, 60607 (Blue Line: UIC Halsted)

Text available to Chicagoans upon request.

Mark your calendars now for our upcoming miniseminar with Joshua Kates, “Radical Empiricism Revisited,” at which we’ll explore the Kantian inflections of empiricism in Deleuze, Latour, and Luhmann as they oppose Derrida and early Foucault. Friday 22 November, 3-5pm, location TBA; paper to be pre-circulated.

What’s happening in theory this fall? Send us your event proposals and announcements, check out our calendar for recommended events, and connect with us on Facebook for frequent links and commentary.

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Renegade Aesthetics

The aesthetic resistance to theory. Aesthetic indistinction. The aesthetic that theorizes itself. The sensitivities and perceptions that exceed theoretical vision. (Not) knowing it when you see it. Autonomy.
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Does the new aesthetic turn adequately grapple with whether there can even be such a thing as aesthetic theory? InterCcECT is excited to host a reading group on Renegade Aesthetics led by special guest Benjamin Morgan. We’ll be tackling selections from very recent works by Steven Connor (“Doing Without Art”), Sianne Ngai (Our Aesthetic Categories), and Jacques Ranciere (Aisthesis). Contact us for PDFs.

Thanks to the generous partnership of The Scholl Center, we will meet Friday 9 August, 2pm, at The Newberry Library, room B92.

What are you theorizing? InterCcECT happily announces your events and eagerly receives your proposals. And don’t forget to connect with us on Facebook.

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totality, represented: an InterCcECT reading group on Fredric Jameson

9781844674541-frontcoverJameson’s recent Representing Capital encounters Marx’s first volume through foregrounding the reading modes necessary to appreciate Marx’s writing modes, which are themselves not peripheral to the subject matter but essential.

Jameson writes “the central formal problem of Capital Volume I is the problem of representation: namely how to construct a totality out of individual elements, historical processes, and perspectives of all kinds; and indeed how to do justice to a totality which is not only non-empirical as a system of relationships, but which is also in full movement, in expansion, in a movement of totalization which is essential to its very existence and at the heart of its peculiar economic nature.”

Join InterCcECT for a reading of Jameson’s reading.
Friday, 28 June, 2pm
Bucktown / Wicker Park Public Library (Community Room, 2nd Floor).
1701 N Milwaukee, accessible via Blue Line Damen or Milwaukee, North, Damen, Western, and Armitage buses.

As always, to propose events write us us or connect on Facebook.

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Psychoanalysis, Phenomenology, Paul: May’s finale; summer’s open vista


As semesters adjourn and quarters eye the end, InterCcECT invites you to propose summer projects. What are your summer reading goals? Writing goals? Want to convene a session or working group? We want you! Contact us us or connect on Facebook.

May is wrapping up with a theory bang around town; let some of these events this week from our calendar inspire your proposals to us!

17-19 May, Which Way Forward for Psychoanalysis?
19-21 May, Phenomenology Roundtable
20-21 May, Paul of Tarsus Working Group presents Aidan Tynan, “Belief in This World: Deleuze, Paul and the Apocalyptic Mood” and InterCcECTer Adam Kotsko, “What St. Paul and the Franciscans Can Tell Us About Neoliberalism: On Agamben’s The Highest Poverty”.

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the void of / in Badiou’s Ontology: a talk by Tzuchien Tho

fWith the generous support of Gallery 400, InterCcECT is very pleased to present “Nothing Just Isn’t (what it used to be): The Void and Structure,” a talk by Tzuchien Tho, researcher at The Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften and The Centre International d’Etude de la Philosophie Française Contemporaine. Join us Thursday 25 April at 4pm at Gallery 400!

abstract:
Alain Badiou inherited a series of concepts in the late 60’s that manifest a similar sort of argumentative strategy. From
Neo-Kantianism, French epistemologie, Hegelianism and structuralism, there were a number of different figures of the void, the nothing, indeed the “not”, all of which stood in as a reified repository for the undetermined and contingent (the virtual), the not-yet (the new in history), the horizon of determination and knowledge (regulative judgment). By looking at how Badiou refuted this construal of the problem of the void (the nothing and the like) in the late 60’s, I will demonstrate how these initial works led to his arguments concerning the void in the 1980’s provided a real alternative to those that he inherited. In turn, understanding Badiou’s rejection from this late 60’s context of treating the notion of the void sheds light on the meaning of his “mathematical ontology” through set theory and allows us to evaluate his larger philosophical project from a different historical vantage.

highlights from our calendar: — as always, Contact us to announce or propose events!
12-13 April, Norms of Freedom in Kant and Hegel
19-20 April, Death Penalties
20 April, Andrew Curran, Before Anthropology: Enlightenment Science and the Category of the Human
2 May, Jacques Derrida: Points of Departure

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